Are you looking to improve your Arabic or your grades in general? Perhaps you're looking to get a new or better job? Or are you simply seeking more in life?

What if a question could help? My new book 91 Days of Q - questions to help you create the life you desire provides simple, practical questions to help unstick you from places you get stuck and to help you see greater possibilities. 

All these questions are available for free, online at www.thedailyq.co. Or gift yourself a copy of the paperback, eBook pdf or audio version to keep you in the zone no matter where you are? 

Wishing you a joyous festive season! Mary-Jane
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What if study were fun & easy?

What are your points of view about study, including about going to school, college, or university and about learning anything in general?

That's it's hard, will take a long time and lots of money? That you're not smart or diligent enough? That you shouldn't rest, sleep, or enjoy yourself because you should be studying?

How many vested interests are making study hard for you? Do teachers want you to outshine them? No. Do after school tutoring businesses want you to hire them? Yes. And other students? Do they want you to see your talent? No.

Are you willing to consider a different possibility? If so, ask “What if study were easy and fun?” 

What if you approached study with the energy of an insatiable curiosity about things that inspire you? 

What if you were excited about learning new ways to expand your natural talents? 

Would study be more fun, easier, and more rewarding then?
*** 
Like to know more? Visit www.thedailyq.co
 
 
Learning a language can be challenging. Below is our list of study tips. We also recommend visiting the Language Learning Advisor, who has a much more comprehensive list and some really great ideas to help.

1. Be aware of your point of view. If your point of view is that learning Arabic, a language or anything is hard, then that is what will show up. So take the point of view that learning Arabic is fun and easy. Want to know more? Check out this article What if study were fun and success easy?

2. Relax and enjoy yourself. You will be much more successful if you are. If you really can't relax and you find that you are overly stressed or depressed at your lack of progress, then find something else to learn and enjoy yourself.

3. Find the method that suits you. Everyone has their own style. Some have a visual memory and need to see words written down before they can remember them. Others need to hear words, or use them in conversation before they are lodged in their brain (that's me). Simply, there's no point in sitting in a course or using material that does not suit your style.

4. Get the right tools. Downloading our course book and audio materials is a good start. You could also use a dictionary, a grammar book, and a phrase book or two, a small notebook to carry with you to jot down new words, and access to authentic material, including newspapers, magazines, books, and DVDs (my favourite was TV soap operas).

5. Meet the right people. If you are not studying in the Middle East, make a native Arabic speaking friend. If you are studying in an Arabic speaking country, make sure you associate with people who don't want to practice their English on you. Join a club or work part time (or volunteer) somewhere where you will need to use the language and can make friends. You will have a common, understood interest which will make conversations much easier.

6. Make it a habit. Do a little (or a lot!) every day. Take your notebook and dictionary with you everywhere and jot down, or look up words you don't understand. If you can get a small electronic dictionary, hang it around your neck and use it all the time. It worked a treat for me.

7. Be totally immersed. Don't speak English or spend time on the internet reading English websites or watching English TV. Find enjoyable Arabic alternatives.

8. Do not be afraid of mistakes. Making mistakes when you speaking, reading or writing means that you are actually speaking, reading or writing. Practice is the best way to learn and improve.

9. Be aware it’s a different way of thinking. Sometimes you may not comprehend something not because you don’t know the Arabic words, but because the point of view is different to the one you know. Be as open as you can to new or different ways of thinking about everything.
 
 
Teaching English is BIG business in around the world, especially in Asia where I live now. A lot of people make a lot of money. Good for them. Nothing wrong with business making money.

And the more money you spend on education the better, right? Maybe.....

Koreans are arguably the most well known for their 'zeal for English proficiency' (translation: spending huge amounts of time and money). But their average TOEFL scores have dropped to 80th place out of 163 countries. Still comparatively better than China (105th) and Japan (135th).

What's up with this?

Could it be that the generally accepted point of view about English is that you need to spend excessive amounts of blood, sweat, tears, time and money to learn it? And even then you probably won't be any good.

Are you studying Arabic now and is this your point of view too?

Great starting point, right? No? So if this starting point doesn't work for you, read on to see...

My interesting points of view

1. Be aware of your point of view. If your point of view is that learning a language (or anything for that matter) is hard, then that is what it will be. So start by asking yourself: What will it take for learning languages to be fun and easy?

2. Relax and enjoy yourself. Do little kids learn languages effortlessly? Sure. How? They simply play and have fun, absorbing the language on the way. So ask yourself: what will it take for me to allow my childlike language ability to return and for me to relax and enjoy myself?

If you really can't relax and find that you are increasingly stressed or depressed, then STOP IT and find something else that you do enjoy. Truth, will you ever be successful at something you don't enjoy? So you would keep banging your head against the wall for what reason?

The world needs an infinite number of talents and abilities. What if by persevering with language study you hate, instead of doing what you are really good at and love, you are actually depriving the world of your brilliance? Are you really willing to be that selfish?

3. Find the method that suits you. Everyone has their own style. Some have a visual memory and need to see words written down before they can remember them. Others need to hear words, or use them in conversation before they are lodged in their brain (that's me). Be aware of what works for you and choose that. There's no point in sitting in a course or using material that does not suit you.

4. Find tools that work for you. Keep asking questions and looking until you find a teacher, class, course book, dictionary, grammar book, phrase book, audio/video and authentic materials including newspapers, magazines, books and films that suit your style. My favourite was always TV and radio mystery dramas. You couldn't drag me away! So what's fun for you?

5. Mix with the right people. Ask yourself: who is fun for me to talk to and learn from? Make native speaking friends no matter where you are. Join a club or work part time (or volunteer) in places where you will need to use the language and can make friends. You will have a common, understood interest which will make conversations much easier.

6. Ask questions. A GREAT way to have a conversation is to ask questions and listen. How does it get any easier than that? To start, memorise ONE question and ask ten people...then sit back and listen.

7. Make it a habit. Do a little (or a lot!) every day. Take your notebook and dictionary with you everywhere and jot down, or look up words you don't understand. If you can get a small electronic dictionary, hang it around your neck and use it all the time. If what you're doing is fun, you'll want to do it a lot anyway.

8. Be totally immersed. Don't speak your own language or spend time on the internet reading your own language websites or watching TV. Find enjoyable alternatives in the language you're studying.

9. What if you made NO mistakes? What if everything you spoke, read, wrote or listened to was the perfect next step to getting you to the next level? Instead of giving yourself a hard time for not being perfect, ask: what's right about this I'm not getting and how could I do it differently next time? Just a different interesting point of view.

10. Be aware it’s a different way of thinking. Sometimes you may not comprehend something not because you don’t know the words, but because the point of view is simply different to the one you already have locked in your brain. So before you jump to a conclusion that you don't understand something ask yourself: what am I not getting that if I looked at it differently I would understand?

My secret trick

Here is my secret trick to language learning: be a 'bobble head'. You know, one of those dolls whose head wobbles endlessly? Just smile and nod, smile and nod, say 'ah ha', 'mmm?' 'I see' and occasionally repeat a word or two the other person is saying.

People love to talk. If they think you are listening, they will just keep talking. So show them you are a willing listener by being a bobble head.

People also love to repeat themselves, telling the same story many different ways. Eventually, after you listen long enough you will get what they are saying. At first, you may not get it verbally, but you will get the picture and expand your language abilities in the process.

Who am I and what do I know?

So what do I know anyway? After all, I'm a native English speaker and don't have to suffer what Korean, Japanese and Chinese kids do.

That's true. But over the course of my life I have reached a 'diplomatic professional' level in Japanese, Korean and Arabic. I have interpreted for Australian government Ministers and written this Arabic language text book.

How did I do all that? I have no idea. What I do know is that I didn't start with the point of view that I couldn't do it and that it would be hard. I started with a curiosity to find out how languages worked and with a keen interest in using them to find out about other people.

So what could Koreans, Japanese and Chinese really do with English if they didn't start with the point of view that English was 'hard' and instead had an intense personal curiosity to find out more? Oh yeah, and actually enjoyed it? Would that make a difference?

If this change did happen, would language businesses stop making money? Or would they expand – and make even more money – because more people were learning the language with real zeal?

****

If you're interested in reading the interesting points of view of an amazing language master, read what Stuart Jay Raj says here.
 
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    Hi there!

    I'm a former diplomat seeing what I can do to help make the world a more fun place.

    In 1995-98 I lived in Egypt and Syria, where I wrote Syrian Colloquial Arabic. 


    Now I live between Korea and Australia, with my Korean sculptor husband and our three children.

    For more information about what I'm up to now please visit 

    www.mary-jane.co
    www.thedailyq.co
    www.conscious-living.asia
    www.healthyhomes.asia.

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